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Predictors of neonatal death in Ashanti, Ghana: a cross-sectional study

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Document pages: 12 pages

Abstract: Neonatal mortality from birth remains a public health problem, especially in sub Saharan Africa. The purpose of this study was to assess maternal, neonatal and health system related factors affecting neonatal mortality in Ashanti, Ghana. method. Through systematic random sampling, 222 mothers and their infants within 28 days after birth were recruited in the maternal and infant ward (MBU) of komfo anokye teaching hospital (Kah) in Kumasi, Ashanti region, Ghana. Open and closed questions were used to collect data through face-to-face interviews. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the effects of proximal and facility related factors on the probability of neonatal death. Results 115 out of 222 mothers (51.8 ) whose babies did not survive. Majority, 53.9 , of babies died within 1–4 days, 31.3 within 5–14 days, and 14.8 within 15–28 days. The cause of death included asphyxia, low birth weight, congenital anomalies, infections, and respiratory distress syndrome. Neonatal deaths were influenced by proximal factors (parity, duration of pregnancy, and disease of the mother such as HIV AIDS), neonatal factors (birth weight, gestational period, sex of baby, and Apgar score), and health related factors (health staff attitude, supervision of delivery, and hours spent at labour ward). Conclusion. This study shows a high level of neonatal deaths in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. This finding suggests the need for health education programmes to improve on awareness of the dangers that can militate against neonatal survival as well as strengthening the health system to support mothers and their babies through pregnancy and delivery and postpartum to help improve child survival.

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