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Effects of different serum potassium levels on cardiac function and hemodynamics after resuscitation in patients with non traumatic out of hospital cardiac arrest

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Document pages: 8 pages

Abstract: Background in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), continuous recovery of autonomic circulation (ROSC) can be preliminarily established; However, high levels of serum potassium (hyperkalemia) still impair hemodynamics early after resuscitation. The effects of different potassium levels on early cardiac function after resuscitation are not clear. Our aim was to analyze the relationship between different levels of serum potassium early after resuscitation (the first hour after reaching sustained ROSC) and cardiac function after resuscitation. method. The data of continuous ROSC in 479 patients with non traumatic OHCA were obtained retrospectively. Measurement of cardiac function (heart rate, blood pressure and heart rhythm) and hemodynamics (urine volume) in the early stage after resuscitationand blood pH), and the duration of survival were analyzed in the case of different serum potassium levels (low: <3.5; normal: 3.5–5; high: >5 mmol L). Results. Most patients (59.9 , n = 287) had previously presented with high levels of potassium. Bradycardia, nonsinus rhythm, urine output <1 ml kg hr, and acidosis (pH < 7.35) were more common in patients with high levels of potassium (all ). Compared with hyperkalemia, a normal potassium level was more likely to be associated with a normal heart rate (OR: 2.97, 95 CI: 1.74–5.08) and sinus rhythm (OR: 2.28, 95 CI: 1.45–3.58). A low level of potassium was more likely to be associated with tachycardia (OR: 3.54, 95 CI: 1.32–9.51), urine output >1 ml kg hr (OR: 5.35, 95 CI: 2.58–11.10), and nonacidosis (blood pH >7.35, OR: 7.74, 95 CI: 3.78–15.58). The duration of survival was shorter in patients with hyperkalemia than that in patients whose potassium levels were low or normal (). Conclusion. Early postresuscitation heart function and hemodynamics were associated with the serum potassium level. A high potassium level was more likely to be associated with bradycardia, nonsinus rhythm, urine output <1 ml kg hr, and acidosis. More importantly, a high potassium level decreased the duration of survival.

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